Sermon: Always Gettin’ What Ya Want

Always Gettin’ What Ya Want1 Sam. 8:4-20, 11:14-15

Click here for the audio.. This might be a good week to do so, since then of the preached sermon differed from the end of the manuscript..

This morning the lectionary, that rhythm of readings used by many churches, begins the summer of David. I thought it would be fun for us to spend some time this summer joining in that journey. We will follow David through ups and downs, highs and lows, and we will be witnesses of God’s work through out this season. We will partake in the presence of the Almighty, as God lifts us David, and shakes God’s head in disgust – we will hear where God is doing the same with us, and through it all we will understand the ferocity of God’s love for God’s people – through the good and the not so good. 

So as this summer of David begins, you might be asking your self, “Self, Pastor just read the Scripture and we didn’t hear about David. Instead we heard about Samuel, the People, and Saul. What gives?” Well, friends…this week serves as sort of a prologue – a set up, if you will, for all the things that are to come.

This morning, as the Summer of David begins, I would like for us to spend some time on the subject of what happens when you Always Get What Ya Want.

Let’s pray….

Let’s set the scene, created the context upon which we will be spending our time this morning. As we begin this reading this morning, there is no nation of Israel so to speak. There are the 12 tribes of Judah, the people known as the Hebrews, but there is not certified nation state. Think of it as a confederations of states working who share a common identity, yet have no overarching national governing structure. When it comes to defending land or protecting people, it can be an iffy proposition to get some of the other tribes to help.

There have been a series of Judges lifted up by God to help lead the people through times of trial (usually of their own doing), in fact there is an entire book of the Bible that chronicles the exploits of these Judges. It is the action movie of the Bible. There is intrigue, there are battles, there are love stories…it is the book where some of our favorite and head scratching stories come from … The strong man Samson and his lady love Delilah, The warrior Deborah, and Gideon come to mind as epic stories of battle and intrigue, but then there are the head scratchers like Ehud and Eglon – the throne room killing (those of you in Wednesday Bible Study can explain that to some who might not know), we have the story of Jephthah having to sacrifice his own daughter…the Judges ruled the tribes, but when their need was done the settled back into obscurity.

Enter Samuel, the boy who spent his life in the service of God. He is called upon to be a Judge for the people of Judah. He is called upon by the people to fulfill a specific request. They have all gotten together at the Hebrew National Convention and created a platform and have decided that they need a King to unite the people and create a unified Nation State. They are tired of being a loose confederation of states and want and anointed leader to bring them together. They saw that Samuel’s two sons (next in line to be judges) were crooked and could be paid off by the highest bidder, the would let the Koch Brothers dictate their decisions and not the Voice of God.

Now, one would think that Samuel would be pleased at this…it would take some of the burden off of his shoulders, after all as a called prophet of the most high he would serve as an advisor to the King. However, that is not the case. Samuel is angry. He is livid. He knows this is a big mistake. You see, God’s plan never intended for there to be a King. God’s plan was that the people would trust God’s faithfulness…You know, the God who brought their ancestors out of slavery, the God who tore down Jericho’s walls, who raised up Judges again and again to restore them … That God…the plan was for God to provide for them, but noooo, now they were telling Samuel, that wasn’t good enough. They needed someone they could see to be their leader. So, Samuel, does what a good judge does. He says to the people, “Let me pray on it.” And he does. 

Well, God answers the prayers of the people. God says, “Y’all are gonna get what ya ask for.” Samuel tells them as much, but tries to convince them by letting them know it isn’t going to be a bed of roses. The king will have a draft in war time and your kids are gonna die, the king will take from you, he will uses your girls as “bakers,” he will enslave you…are you sure you want to do this. And like a child not quite comprehending consequences the answer is a resounding, “YES!”

And after a couple chapters of telling the story of the soon to be monarch, we see Samuel anoint Saul. King of the Hebrews. The people rejoice with gladness and praise to God. Samuel, shakes his head, “always gettin’ what ya want.”

****

The people want a king. They want that thing that the other nations have. The nations that are always attacking them…they want a leader they can see. They want to have the perception that someone is in control. That someone will get them out of the problems they have. The people want a king.
In my pondering and preparations for today it occurred to me that, even though we live in a democracy, we still love our kings. We are always putting a crown on something that helps to give us meaning. Be it our duly elected president, but even more close to home – all of the things we elevate to royalty. This happens not just on a personal level, but on so many levels. 

There are holes that we need to have filled, and the way we do that is by crowning something. Elevating it to the place of prominence.

At home we do it. Often times it is out of a sense of necessity or desperation. Like the people of old who were tired of being over run by the foreign forces, we get tired of the mountains of our lives. The mountains that grow so high that when the eventual avalanche comes we don’t know if we will survive. 

The mountain of bills that just seems to keep growing. You pay one off, only to have the hydra head sprout two new bills. We shuffle our resources as much as we can, You cut costs, you try to be responsible, but when there is no additional income, the cuts can only do some much before you are overwhelmed by the avalanche of anxiety. So you pray of a king. You try to find fixes that make sense, that will work. So the credit card application that comes in the mail gets crowned as the way to pay off the other bills, if you untie them maybe you can pay them. But you become enslaved by the 25% interest rate and soon the avalanche begins again.

You might crown the king of beers and bow to the potentate of chemistry to alter how we feel. Thinking that this newly crowed king will take away the problems, but you don’t see the manipulation of the crown royale. You don’t see how the addiction has become a prison and traps us, yes, other problems seem to disappear, but you don’t see the damage done by this ruthless king because he has blinded you with a false sense of security.
Churches do this when they elevate pastors to places of royalty. Sorry, to tell you, but we are mere mortals not miracle workers. The new pastor comes in crowned the one to save the church. The one to take all that has happened before and create a new land. Churches will throw money to programs and projects that worked in the past and haven’t worked in a decade, because at one time those programs were the shining crown jewels. And as they bow down to these kings, these ones, they begged for, they don’t see the world around them changing and the mission of the church changing. 

Politicians are crowned ever 2, 4, or 6 years to be the next savior of the nation. Each one comes to office wearing the crown. They come to office anointed by the electorate, only to get caught up in the worship of ideology and partisan politics. These kings are the ones who get drunk with power. Who begin to create policy that’s only beholden to the highest bidder, or is guaranteed to slaughter the enemy leaving behind only one choice. 

These “leaders” begin to worship their own image. They bask in the glory that has painted them the savior of their party. The prostitute themselves, selling their souls, and forget that they were once anointed. But like Saul, that anointing can be revoked.

And we do all of this not because we have intended to ignore God, but because we want to see something. We want to put our faith into something tangible. We want to trust that which we can see. That which we can know is there. And we, either on purpose or not, forget the faithfulness of God. We forget that through all of the mess, through all of the upheaval, God is always present and is there to get us through. To get you through. The faithfulness of God is the stead fast rock that will not be moved. And even when we crown kings to be the ones we follow, because we know the rest of the story – the story that those begging Samuel did not know – we have the possibility to depose the kings we adore and again stand on the steadfast rock.

We know, that even while the people forgot God’s faithfulness, God cold not forget God’s promise. God took their mess and even through it made something beautiful. Through their mess God made a way out of no way – God, through the line of a King they were never supposed to have came to earth – brought God’s kingly rule to earth in the person of Jesus Christ. In Jesus we see the result of God’s faithfulness. We see the embodiment of what the Kingdom of God would look like…

God takes this line of kings and through them write the story of God’s faithfulness. We, looking at the rest of the story see how God, in God’s eternal love for God’s people, takes unexpected people – the screw ups – and creates the blood line of God’s incarnated self. We see how, even as a King was not God’s desired plan – God took that screw up and answered the prayers of the people – just not how they could immediately see it. God created the blood line that would lead to the true king being bore in the barn stall of bethlehem. The king who would would ride in to Jerusalem on the back of a donkey. The king that would be crowned on a bloody hill and installed in an empty tomb. Through the bloodline of kings we get the king of kings.

In Jesus we see a king who does the opposite of that which Samuel warns – we have a king who sacrifices himself for his people, who does not enslave but liberates, we have a king who is not a king of battle but the lord of love. Through Jesus we get a peek of what what it is God intends for us. Life, freedom, and love. The hallmarks of the God who died of calvary’s tree. 

The people of Samuel’s age did not know what was to come, they just neglected to remember what had been. They were the children of a faithful God – there were the children who crossed a Red Sea, who wandered through the wilderness to the promised land – led by a cloud of smoke by day and a pillar of fire by night. They were the children who fit the battle of Jericho and lived through the time of the Judges – where were the inheritors of God’s faithfulness yet they forgot and wanted a king.

We have many crowned kings in our lives, but even through the illegitimate coronations – God is faithful. Let us remember that. Let us remember as we come together in worship – as we become part of the story of faithfulness. As we sing the songs of faith, hear the recitation of the Holy Word, as we pray for and with each other and as we eat the Holy Meal – let us always be reminded of the faithfulness of a God who uses even our screw ups to bring about all that is good. It is the faithfulness of God that fills us and sustains us. 

It isn’t the pastor who is going to make the church grow – it is the people of God working together and trusting in God’s faithfulness that will grow and redefine the church.
It isn’t on our own that you will get through the difficult times. The stiff upper lip will only get you so far. The false kings will only continue to battle against you, but it is God’s faithfulness that life up people to walk this journey with you. It is God’s faithful ness that will shine like a pillar of fire leading you to a land of healing and recovery, stability and abundance. And those things won’t be what they world says they look like, but they will be a place of peace that when you get there you will know surely it is God who got yo there.

It isn’t Fox News or the Koch Brothers that will give us true leaders of change. It isn’t the RNC of the DNC that are the arbiters of promise, but it is God faithfulness that will raise up leaders – that will lift up a Joshua or a Deborah; a David or and Esther; an Isaiah or a Mary that will speak truth to power. That will lift up the voices of the voice less. That will be bearers of God’s faithfulness.

Because God’s faithfulness promises liberation from captive kings – will release you from your Babylonia captivity – it will free you from the idolatry of ideology, from the obsessions of society. Through the faithfulness of God you have see the promise that is our future as followers of Christ, you have heard the promise that is to come when in the end we will be raised up at the end of days, but friends – the rest fo the story is that even now we are made free. Our king has come and has freed us from the chains of captive kings, the chains that enslave us and hold us captive. The king of kings and lord of lords has come to embolden the Holy Spirit in us. Because God’s faithfulness frees us to and compels us to be apart of this new and living kingdom. 

For our God is good all the time. All the time our God is good.

Thanks be to God. 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: